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Nerve Pain Arizona

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6309 E. Baywood Ave.
Mesa, AZ 85206
Tel: 480-325-3801
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Nerve Pain/Neuralgia

The term pinched nerve describes one type of damage or injury to a nerve or set of nerves.

The term "pinched nerve" is often used as a catch-all phrase for injuries resulting from compression, constriction, or stretching.

Symptoms include numbness, "pins and needles" or burning sensations, and pain radiating outward from the injured area. One of the most common examples of a single compressed nerve is the feeling of having a foot or hand "fall asleep."

Neuralgia


Trigeminal neuralgia is the most common form of neuralgia. Trigeminal neuralgia is a nerve disorder that causes a stabbing or electric-shock-like pain in parts of the face. Neuralgia is most common in elderly people, but it may occur at any age. Sometimes no specific cause is found.

Symptoms


  • Impaired function of affected body part due to pain, or muscle weakness due to motor nerve damage
  • Increased sensitivity of the skin or numbness of the affected skin area (feeling similar to a local anesthetic, such as a Novocaine shot)
  • Pain along the path of a specific nerve
  • Pain located anywhere, usually on or near the surface of the body
  • In the same location for each episode
  • Sharp, stabbing pain that comes and goes (intermittent) or constant, burning pain

Any touch or pressure is felt as pain. Movement may also be painful.

Exams and Tests


An exam may show:

  • Abnormal sensation in the skin
  • Loss of deep tendon reflexes
  • Loss of muscle mass
  • Lack of sweating (sweating is controlled by nerves)
  • Tenderness along a nerve, often in the lower face and jaw and rarely in the temple and forehead
  • Trigger points (areas where even a slight touch triggers pain)

A dental examination can rule out dental disorders that may cause facial pain (such as a tooth abscess). Other symptoms (such as redness or swelling) may help rule out conditions such as infections, bone fractures, or rheumatoid arthritis. There are no specific tests for neuralgia, but the following tests may be done to find the cause of the pain:

  • Blood tests to check blood sugar and kidney function
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
  • Nerve conduction study with electromyography

What is Sciatica?


Sciatica is pain, tingling, or numbness produced by an irritation of the nerve roots that lead to the sciatic nerve. The sciatic nerve is formed by the nerve roots coming out of the spinal cord into the lower back. Branches of the sciatic nerve extend through the buttocks and down the back of each leg to the ankle and foot. What causes sciatica? The most common cause of sciatica is a bulging or ruptured disc (herniated disc) in the spine pressing against the nerve roots that lead to the sciatic nerve. But sciatica also can be a symptom of other conditions that affect the spine, such as narrowing of the spinal canal (spinal stenosis), bone spurs (small, bony growths that form along joints) caused by arthritis, or nerve root compression (pinched nerve) caused by injury. In rare cases, sciatica can also be caused by conditions that do not involve the spine, such as tumors or pregnancy.

What are the Symptoms?


Symptoms of sciatica include pain that begins in your back or buttocks and moves down your leg and may move into your foot. Weakness, tingling, or numbness in the leg may also occur.

  • Sitting, standing for a long time, and movements that cause the spine to flex (such as knee-to-chest exercises) may make symptoms worse.
  • Walking, lying down, and movements that extend the spine (such as shoulder lifts) may relieve symptoms.

How Nerve Pain/Neuralgia will be Treated at DPI


The goal of treatment is to reverse or control the cause of the nerve problem (if found), and provide pain relief. Treatment varies depending on the cause, location, and severity of the pain, and other factors. Even if the cause of the neuralgia is never identified, the condition may improve on its own or disappear with time.

The cause (if known) should be treated. This may include surgery to remove tumors or separate the nerve from blood vessels or other structures that press on it. This can be done for some cases of carpal tunnel syndrome and trigeminal neuralgia. Strict control of blood sugar may speed recovery in people with diabetes who develop neuralgia.

Treatments may include:


  • Local injections of pain-relieving (anesthetic) drugs
  • Nerve blocks
  • Surgical procedures (such as ablation using radiofrequency, heat, balloon compression, or injection of chemicals) to reduce feeling in the nerve.

The Goals of Treatment are the following


  • Avoid or modify activities that aggravate pain
  • Relieve pain through rehabilitation, pain medications and procedures
  • Maintain movement and muscle strength through physical therapy
  • Decrease stress on the body by using braces, canes, walkers, and wheelchairs as needed
  • Correct, control, or slow down the underlying disease process
  • Improve quality of life through increased ability to participate in social and occupational activities
 

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If you are looking for the best pain management doctors in the Valley, who treat back pain, neck pain, joint pain, injured knees, injured ankles, foot pain and lower back pain, contact the pain specialists at Desert Pain Institute. We offer prompt, effective relief for all types of body pain and serve the following Arizona commmunities of Scottsdale, Phoenix, Paradise Valley, Carefree, Cave Creek, New River, Anthem, Fountain Hills, Chandler, Mesa, Tempe, Rio Verde and Tonto Verde, Arizona.